DORIS COLBERT KENNEDY
Bio
Doris Colbert Kennedy is a fourth generation Washingtonian. She earned her BFA and MFA in painting and art history at Howard University where she studied under Dr.James A. Porter, Dr. David C. Driskell, Lois Jones and Skunder Boghassian.

Ms. Kennedy has exhibited extensively in the United States as well as in West Africa where she resided for several years. Her works have been shown at: the James C. Lewis Museum ((MD); The Wilmer Jennings Gallery (NY); Pen and Brush (NY); the National Arts Club of New York; The Washington Gallery of Art; Fisk, Howard and American Universities; and The National Arts Council of Ghana.

Ms. Kennedy served as Artist-in-Residence at Howard University. She is a founding member of The National Association of Ghanaian Artists. She has also been a consultant for the Washington Project for the Arts (W.P.A.)and a grant recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts.

As an arts educator, Ms. Kennedy has taught at the Corcoran School of Art, American University, Howard University, the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana, and the Maryland College of Art and Design.

Dr. David Driskell, in his introduction to her exhibition “This Place,” stated that Ms. Kennedy “….has developed in her work a way of seeing the surface and inner depth of form in a manner which define a very personal yet modernist approach to art…. The brush is manipulated and controlled in a manner so as to retain the fluid effect of line long after the work is completed.” The drama and sensitivity she uses in the expression of light, “….ultimately communicate her own personal genius.”

Dr. Lisa E. Farrington, in her essay “Women Devoted to Excellence,” states that Kennedy’s paintings are “…indicative of Abstract Expressionism in the forcefulness of the artist’s brushwork….akin to Color Field painting in their broad areas of pigment….redolent of Color Field greats such as Robert Motherwell and Barnett Newman.”

Paul Richard, in a critical review of her drawings for the Washington Post, stated that, “Few artists hereabouts can do as much with ink. Her techniques are astonishing.”